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There is nothing that each person fears more than getting to know how enormously much we are capable of doing and becoming.

– Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855)

Engaging in therapy can be a life-altering experience, opening new lines of thinking and creating positive changes across multiple dimensions.  While you or your child might be struggling with something easily identifiable (e.g. marked depression, debilitating anxiety, etc.), it is sometimes the more subtle difficulties of the human experience that warrant closer examination.  By building a healthy working relationship with patients, I attempt to support them in becoming who they want to be in the world while providing them the space and means by which to cultivate the skills and strategies necessary to enhance their overall state of health.

As a function of working and receiving specialty training in myriad arenas, I consider myself a generalist in practical terms.  My theoretical orientation and fundamental grounding, however, is based in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT).  I firmly believe that an individual’s thoughts, feelings, physiological processes and historical experiences jointly determine their behavior as a human being. CBT adaptively permits me to flexibly intervene with patients on all of the preceding levels. I have found, though, that forcing a particular style onto an individual who is resistant to it serves no purpose but to generate sentiments of misunderstanding, disengagement and confusion.  Thus, as necessary, I amend my general clinical framework to better cater to the idiosyncratic needs of those with whom I work so that they will feel respected, valued and affirmed. My ultimate objective is to create a field of interpersonal comfort and empathic understanding with patients and their families that best support their self-reported goals to improve their quality of life.